british press

Readers of Britain’s press have shown their dislike of the eurozone in internet comment rooms this morning, but some showed they dislike Great Britain’s leader even more.

After news broke that France’s President Nicolas Sarkozy had told Britain’s prime minister David Cameron XXXXXX, one person wrote: “We too are sick about being told what to do by Cameron, so [Mr Sarkozy] join the club.”

Another wrote: “The French are right. The UK wants to meddle and play in a system it doesn’t want to be part of – can’t have it both ways.”

But the reaction on message boards of the right-leaning Telegraph, at least, was generally hostile: “Quite the contrary, Monsieur President – it is we [the British] who are sick and tired of being told what to do by the German-Franco Axis.

“The EU is not part of the problem, it is the problem.”

A number of writers noted Sarkozy might soon be voted out of power in any case.



As for France this the country that Cameron wants to share an aircraft carrier with. Come the day you can be sure France would say non.

Today is not a day to put your trust in Cameron.

A 17 nation block should not be cause for concern as we are well able (with the right leadership) to hold our own on the world stage.

However dark clouds lie ahead and this is not the time to lower our defences.
Don’t worry,the arrogant dwarf will soon be out on his ear courtesy of the French electorate.

This does make me laugh!!

Now CamEUron sees Le Petit Nicolas for what he is and gets a dose of what the French really think but try not to say too often. They are still carrying a colossal ‘pomme frite sur l’épaule’ as a result of our history. Certain things can, in the right circumstances, trigger explosive rages and rants, like mentioning Trafalgar, Waterloo, Agincourt, D-Day etc etc etc. Poor Dave has just discovered this and is probably a little shocked…. and wondering just how sharing aircraft carriers will work…


M Sarkozy probably doesn’t understand that here in the UK, political leaders don’t do or decide anything, they just criticise the other parties.

That’s why you have the unedifying sight of Cameron and Osborne grandstanding in Brussels, just moaning at everyone, without putting forward any solutions.
Welcome to democracy, UK style.

The problem is that Cameron has never engaged. There should always have been three ‘big’ European leaders involved in steering the EU; Merkel, Sarkozy and Cameron.

Cameron has been invisible.

You hate everything that’s not anglo-saxon.
Your newspapers spend most of their time making fun of foreigners.

Truth is that in the rest of the continent we don’t really care about you – but now given your repeated attacks on the Euro and Europe – you will pay the price of your arrogance

During two hours of bitter exchanges during a meeting of all 27 EU leaders before a crisis summit of the eurozone’s 17 members on Wednesday, President Sarkozy fought hard to get the Prime Minister barred from talks that would finalise a 100billion euros cash injection into banks.
“We’re sick of you criticising us and telling us what to do. You say you hate the euro, you didn’t want to join and now you want to interfere in our meetings,” the French leader told Mr Cameron, according to diplomats.
Mr Cameron supports steps that the eurozone is taking to boost its banks and bailouts funds as part of wider moves towards closer fiscal union in order to avert a European debt crisis that has threatened to plunge the global economy into a slump.
But he fears that regular meetings of the euro’s 17 governments will lead to the creation of a Franco-Greman dominated “caucus” or a bloc that could hijack the EU’s single market for its own ends, damaging the British economy by imposing regulations that benefit Paris or Frankfurt over the City of London.
“There is danger that as the eurozone comes together that those countries outside might see the eurozone start to take decisions on some of the things that are vital to them in the single market, for instance financial services,” he said.
Following strong and vocal support from Sweden and Poland, Mr Cameron secured agreement that he and non-euro countries would be invited to the bank rescue summit next week, even at the price of having to reschedule his planned trip to Australian and Japan.
He also won a fight to include a “safeguard clause” that the eurozone would not be allowed to take any decisions on issues, such as regulation of financial services, that affected all the EU’s 27 members.
“I have secured a commitment today that we must safeguard the interests of countries that want to stay outside the euro, particularly with respect to the integrity of the single market for all 27 members.
The EU text, described as a “major victory” by British diplomats, calls on the European Commission “to safeguard a level playing field among all member states including those not participating in the euro”.
Amid growing Greek anger, strikes and conflict, Herman Van Rompuy, the EU president, said that “further steps will be needed” to impose austerity and praised European leaders for defying popular opposition to bailouts and Brussels-IMF imposed austerity measures.
“Some of those steps were and are unpopular; be it measures taken in your countries or our joint decisions taken here as a Union,” he said. “I thank you for your political courage, often underestimated.”
But Jerzy Buzek, the president of the European Parliament warned the summit that growing public anger over the EU’s handling of the crisis could endanger plans to change European treaties towards greater fiscal union.
“I am concerned, however, that our citizens might not be ready for another round of referendums and ratifications,” he said. “MEPs keep telling me that in their constituencies, many people now see Europe as part of the problem, and not as part of the solution.”

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